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Nigerian Professor Cracks Solution To One of the Seven Millennial Math Problems

Nigerian Professor Cracks Solution To One of the Seven Millennial Math Problems

Nigerian Professor Cracks Solution To One of the Seven Millennial Math Problems

Dr Enoch may have solved the problem first proposed by Bernhard Riemann (pictured) 156 years agoDr Enoch may have solved the problem first proposed by Bernhard Riemann (pictured) 156 years ago

Dr Opeyemi Enoch’s name is going viral across the world. A professor at a Nigerian university, Dr Opeyemi Enoch has solved a problem that had puzzled mathematicians for more than hundred and fifty years.

Dr Opeyemi Enoch who teaches at the Federal University in the city of Oye Ekiti, has reportedly come out with a solution to an age old mathematical problem. Latest reports suggest that the Nigerian professor has actually solved the Riemann Hypothesis.

RiemannHypothesisA report while talking about the Riemann Hypothesis says, “The Riemann hypothesis has thus far resisted all attempts to prove it. Stieltjes (1885) published a note claiming to have proved the Mertens conjecture with c=1, a result stronger than the Riemann hypothesis and from which it would have followed. However, the proof itself was never published, nor was it found in Stieltjes papers following his death (Derbyshire 2004, pp. 160-161 and 250). Furthermore, the Mertens conjecture has been proven false, completely invalidating this claim. In the late 1940s, H. Rademacher’s erroneous proof of the falsehood of Riemann’s hypothesis was reported in Time magazine, even after a flaw in the proof had been unearthed by Siegel (Borwein and Bailey 2003, p. 97; Conrey 2003)”. Many people went on to claim that the theory was unviable.

The Nigerian professor may be able to claim as much as a million dollar prize if the reports are proved right. The professor presented his proof at the International Conference on Mathematics and Computer Science and, if he is proved correct, could win $1m (£657,000) for his troubles.

Some fifteen years ago, in 2000, the Clay Mathematics Institute in the US announced a prize fund for anyone who solved seven mathematical problems that have been puzzled over for years. Till now the fund is awaiting anyone who could do the magic. Now if Dr Enoch’s Proof is accepted, he will be the first person to solve a problem since the prize was founded.

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