Wild Life

Menopausal Killer Whales Become Group Leaders As They Age: Study

Menopausal Killer Whales Become Group Leaders As They Age: Study

Menopausal Killer Whales Become Group Leaders As They Age: Study 

As men age, they get experience. The same seems to be the case with female killer whales who start to get leadership attributes as they age.

A latest study has found that they get natural leadership after their menopause. Researchers have concluded this after analyzing 751-hours of video footage.

The researchers have said that female killer whales actually get to lead their community after attaining menopause. This begins with their taking the role of the pod leader. Then they tend to help other whales of the pod to help them survive. It is more true as the going gets tough.

seaworld-killer-whaleWhile talking about the study authors claim “The value gained from the wisdom of elders can help explain why female resident killer whales and humans continue to live long after they have stopped reproducing.”

Researchers who were analyzing marine mammal s including the killer whales were associated with the University of Exeter. They say that their team of researchers actually analyzed the behavior of 102 killer whales surviving in the wild.

In the course of their study they analyzed and studied 751 hours of video captured over the duration of 9 years was assessed by the team of researchers. It has come out clearly from the study that the older female whales are actually probable to take on leadership in the cluster of whales and direct its team for the hunt of Chinook salmon, their primary source of food

While talking about the findings of the study researchers claim, “Leadership by post reproductive-aged females is especially prominent in difficult years when salmon abundance is low. This finding is critical because salmon abundance drives both mortality and reproductive success.” Researchers further claim “The value gained from the wisdom of elders can help explain why female resident killer whales and humans continue to live long after they have stopped reproducing.”

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