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On 29 February 2016 Kids Wonder Why is There a Leap Day and Why is There a Leap Year

On 29 February 2016 Kids Wonder Why is There a Leap Day and Why is There a Leap Year

On 29 February 2016 Kids Wonder Why is There a Leap Day and Why is There a Leap Year

My niece who turns 16 today had only four birthdays in the last sixteen years. She curses the day that has devoid her from getting birthday gifts like any other girl or boy of her age.

She says her birthday has not just kept her away from gifts like other normal kids her age, she cannot celebrate her birthday every year. To be true as her birthday falls on 29th February, her parents don’t hold birthday parties for her every year.

It is altogether a different thing that they make it a point to make her birthday parties –that come every four years –bigger than the parties of her other siblings.birthday_cake

She curses leap year and says it is only because of it that she has been devoid of her birthdays. A leap year, where an extra day is added to the end of February every four years, is down to the Gregorian calendar’s disparity with the solar system. A complete orbit of the earth around the sun takes exactly 365.2422 days to complete, but the Gregorian calendar uses 365 days. So leap seconds – and leap years – are added as means of keeping our clocks (and calendars) in sync with the Earth and its seasons.

General people actually think of a year as the amount of time it takes for the Earth to revolve around the Sun once. It gets complicated when you try to break it down into smaller units: days, or the length of time it takes the Earth to complete one rotation on its axis. A solar year is 365.242159 days long. This year’s leap day, Feb. 29, 2016, may mean that someone born on Feb. 29, 1916, could jokingly claim they’re turning 25-years-old rather than 100.

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